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Systematic Reviews: Home

This guide will provide an introduction to systematic reviews. Learn what a systematic review is, where to find them, and some tips for creating a review

Welcome

Welcome to the LibGuide on Learning about Systematic Reviews, an increasingly popular method of synthesizing literature on a particular topic.

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Use the tabs above to navigate and find the resources you're looking for. 

Can't find what you need, or have a suggestion for an addition?  Feel free to contact  Please don't hesitate to contact Cara Bradley, the Research and Scholarship Librarian. 

Defining Systematic Reviews

Systematic reviews aim to locate and synthesize research on a particular topic/ research question by using organized, transparent and replicable procedures throughout the process. Systematic reviews are a thorough analysis of all of the available research and literature available on a topic. They also work to critically evaluate the evidence that is identified to address the topic. 

 

 

For further details about systematic reviews here are some helpful videos.

Systematic review videos- Yale University

Resources - What is a Systematic Review

Grant, M.J., & Booth, A. (2009). A typology of reviews: An analysis of 14 review types and associated methodologies. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 26, 91–108. doi:10.1111/j.1471-1842.2009.00848.x. 

Littell, J.H., Corcoran, J., & Pillai, V. (2008). Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195326543.001.0001/acprof-9780195326543. 

Systematic Reviews on the 6S Pyramid

Systematic reviews are an important part of evidence-based practice. The 6S pyramid shows the different levels of medical evidence, with the top being the strongest level of medical evidence. Syntheses are in the middle and can be a strong source of medical evidence. 

Credit: https://dal.ca.libguides.com/systematicreviews/gettingstarted

 

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Mary Chipanshi
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Cara Bradley
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LibGuide Created By

This LibGuide was created by Ally Patton, an intern for the Archer Library in May 2020.